Lessons Learned from McDermott Footcare Clients

shutterstock_206475904Recently, McDermott Footcare celebrated our third anniversary of delivering caring, knowledgeable, quality, certified nursing foot care to Toronto and area clients whom we serve. It is a pleasure and an honour to provide excellent care to a growing number of delighted individuals.

Over the last three years, many people have benefited from McDermott Footcare’s certified nursing foot care services. And over the three years, they have taught us much about caring and respectful care for all.

Here are the lessons that we have learned from the people we serve:

  • It’s not just about the feet. Each McDermott Footcare client/patient has a unique life story. It is an honour to get to know each person served.
  • Clients/patients expect quality care delivered in a timely, professional, compassionate manner. McDermott Footcare is proud to meet these expectations.
  • Clients/patients often have other medically related questions that need an answer. McDermott footcare is qualified to answer all nursing related questions and provide additional teaching as needed. McDermott Footcare also provides consultation letters to the client’s /patient’s physicians as needed.
  • Clients /patients often have questions regarding day-to-day care of their foot related concerns, especially various nail conditions, care of corns and calluses, properly fitted shoes, and skin infections and rashes. McDermott Footcare provides clearly written, pertinent advice on the care of the feet as needed.

Thank you to the clients/patients who continue to place their trust in McDermott Footcare. It is an honour to serve you.To those whom we have not yet had the pleasure of providing excellent certified nursing foot care, McDermott Footcare looks forward to meeting you.

Copyright Terry McDermott. May not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission of author

 

 

 

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Why Do My Calluses and Corns Keep Coming Back?

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A plantar callus

As a Toronto and surrounding area in-home certified foot care nurse, this is a question I often hear. There are many reasons why corns and calluses keep coming back. First of all, what are corns and calluses?

What are the three types of corns?

Seed corn – often found on the ball or the heel of the foot, it is a small, white plug in the skin. It can be painful.

Hard corn – often found on the top of the toe or on the outside of the little toe. It has a thick, white surface.

Soft corn – found between the toes, most often between the fourth and fifth toes.

What is a callus?

A callus is an area of skin that has been subjected to repeated rubbing or friction. An area of dense, rough skin develops to protect the sensitive skin underneath. A callus on the bottom of the foot is called a plantar callus.

What causes corns and calluses?

  • ill-fitting shoes that are either too tight or too loose
  • narrow or pointy-toed shoes
  • high heels
  • structural problems of the foot including hammer toes, bunions, lack of fatty padding on the ball of the foot

How do I stop or at least minimize the occurrence of repeated corns and calluses?

  • have shoes properly fitted
  • avoid wearing very high heels
  • wear mid-high heels that are no more than 2 inches high
  • make sure shoes have well padded insoles
  • there are many good insoles available in the foot care aisle of a well-stocked pharmacy
  • apply moisturizer to affected areas. Use a moisturizer that contains urea since this is especially effective.
  • if you have bunions,  hammertoes or wide feet, make sure your shoes comfortably accommodate them
  • while showering or bathing, use a pumice stone to gently exfoliate dry, rough patches
  • have your corns and calluses reduced by a certified foot care nurse who is trained to do so.

A word about diabetes and corns/calluses:

The risk of getting an infection in the foot is higher in a person with diabetes. Poor healing of open sores and wounds in the foot leads to infection and a higher risk of lower limb amputation. For this reason, a person with diabetes is strongly advised to avoid reducing calluses and removing corns on their own.

Copyright Terry McDermott. May not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission of author

8 Cold Weather and Winter Foot Care Tips For Diabetics

couple enjoying winter

Here in Toronto, diabetic nursing foot care clients of McDermott Footcare are beginning to feel the change in weather. With the cooler temperatures, many clients are wearing thicker clothing, including socks and closed-toe shoes instead of sandals. Cooler temperatures call for a change in foot care routines to ensure the continued health of people living with diabetes.

Here are 8 diabetic foot care tips for a safe, healthy autumn and winter:

  1. Socks:  Wear thick, breathable socks that wick away moisture. Feet continue to sweat in colder temperatures and it is important to wear socks that promote air circulation and wick away perspiration.
  2. Keep feet dry: This goes hand in hand with the advice above. It is important to keep feet dry. Feet that are allowed to remain damp may develop fungal and bacterial infections. Dry your feet thoroughly after bathing or after becoming wet from exposure. Pay particular attention to drying the area between the toes since this is where athlete’s foot infections most commonly develop.
  3. Proper footwear: Wear boots and shoes with a rounded toe box that allows the toes to wriggle comfortably. At the same time, foot wear should fit properly so that the foot is secure. Choose leather and suede over synthetic material since natural materials allow air circulation to the foot. Look for foot wear with adequate traction. Boots and shoes should provide sufficient warmth since diabetic neuropathy may prevent the person from realizing that their feet are becoming cold.
  4. Foot soaks:  Soaking the feet should only be done occasionally. Ten minutes is a safe amount of time to prevent over-drying or maceration of the skin. Maintain a lukewarm water temperature of 90 degrees fahrenheit (32 degrees celsius). Use a thermometer to gauge the temperature or have a non-diabetic person test the water first.
  5. Heated massagers, hot water bottles and heat pads: Because of neuropathy, diabetics have a decreased ability to feel hot temperatures on the feet. For this reason, it is advisable to avoid heated foot massagers, heat pads and hot water bottles.
  6. Moisturize, moisturize, moisturize: During the winter months, it is advisable to use an extra emollient moisturizer on the feet. Keeping the feet moisturized prevents heel cracks and fissures that are painful and are prone to infection. Avoid moisturizing between toes since added moisture encourages bacterial and fungal skin infections.  Ask your certified foot care nurse or doctor to recommend a suitable moisturizer.
  7. Check your feet:  Inspect your feet daily for swelling, heel cracks, dryness, open sores, cuts, bruises, blisters, corns, calluses.  Check for peeling and dampness between the toes since this is a symptom of athlete’s foot.  Use a hand-held mirror to check the soles of the feet.
  8. Nail care: Have a certified foot care nurse clip and file your nails regularly. Nails should be clipped straight across. Thickened, fungal nails should be filed down.

Related articles:

The Importance of Nursing Foot Care for Diabetics

Why Athlete’s Foot is Dangerous in Diabetes

Copyright Terry McDermott. May not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission of author